Kings and Queens of England: Danes and Saxons

Cnut, King of England 1016-1035

The second part of my Kings and Queens of England series covers the years 1013 to 1042. This 29-year period saw six kings on the throne of England and a power struggle between the Saxons and Danes.

Part one ended in 1016 with the death of Æthelred II. In

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Lithium

In the third of my Elements of the Periodic Table series I take a look at lithium. Discovered by Johan Arfwedson in 1817, lithium is a soft, shiny, silver-white alkali metal and the lightest of the solid elements.

The methods of lithium production, its history and the origin of its name are all discussed

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Kings and Queens of England: Early Saxons

The murder of Edward the Martyr

One of the first difficulties encountered when attempting to chronicle any period of history is where to start. Some may start a history of the monarchs of England with Alfred the Great, who drove back the Danes and secured his kingdom of Wessex. Others may choose to begin in

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Helium

First observed by Pierre Janssen during a solar eclipse in 1868, helium is the second lightest of the chemical elements. In the second of my Elements of the Periodic Table series, the essential facts, history and uses of helium are examined, including its use as a coolant in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at

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Hydrogen

Discovered by Henry Cavendish in 1766, hydrogen is the lightest and most abundant of the chemical elements. In the first of a series of articles about the Elements of the Periodic Table, I set out to investigate the essential facts, history and uses of hydrogen.

On the way I look at hydrogen’s stable and

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