13 Evil Creatures to Avoid This Halloween

Halloween is a night of fun. It’s a night of dressing up in ghoulish costumes and telling scary ghost stories. But lurking beneath the surface are a host of evil creatures intent on causing mayhem and destruction. Who are these monsters and how can we avoid them?

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New Website Feature: Article Indexes

The menu bar for this website now includes an item for Article Indexes. Many of my articles form part of a series, and article indexes are a way of grouping these pieces together.

So far I have created indexes for my Elements of the Periodic Table and Kings and Queens of England

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Kings and Queens of England: Edward the Confessor

Edward the Confessor

Often in the study of history a reputation must be stripped away to reveal the real historical figure (or as much as the evidence allows). This applies to the story of Edward the Confessor more than most. Far from being the saintly old man seen in the Bayeux tapestry, Edward was a

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Boron

The fifth entry in my Elements of the Periodic Table series is boron. Boron was first isolated in 1808 by Sir Humphey Davy, in Britain, and Joseph-Louis Gay-Lussac and Louis-Jacques Thenard, in France, and is the first of the semi metals.

Although pure boron is almost chemically inert, its compounds have numerous uses. These

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Walking in the Wye Valley

Ye Olde Ferrie Inne From Yat Rock Viewpoint

A walk through any part of the Wye Valley is always a treat, but the area around Symonds Yat, where Herefordshire and Gloucestershire meet, is something special. With plenty of family activities, river cruises, canoeing, hotels and camping facilities, pubs and restaurants and miles of beautiful walks,

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Beryllium

First isolated in 1828, beryllium is a brittle, grey alkaline earth metal and the fourth element examined in my Elements of the Periodic Table series. As in the previous three instalments of this series, I examine the history and uses of the element, including its use as a neutron source. Methods of extracting beryllium

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What is St Elmo’s Fire?

St Elmo’s Fire on Masts of a Ship at Sea

The weather phenomenon known as St Elmo’s fire has been described by many writers. The logs and memoirs of the early European explorers, on the voyages led by Columbus, Magellan and others, mention the peculiar ‘fire’ on their ships’ masts. Charles Darwin witnessed the lights

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Kings and Queens of England: Danes and Saxons

Cnut, King of England 1016-1035

The second part of my Kings and Queens of England series covers the years 1013 to 1042. This 29-year period saw six kings on the throne of England and a power struggle between the Saxons and Danes.

Part one ended in 1016 with the death of Æthelred II. In

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Lithium

In the third of my Elements of the Periodic Table series I take a look at lithium. Discovered by Johan Arfwedson in 1817, lithium is a soft, shiny, silver-white alkali metal and the lightest of the solid elements.

The methods of lithium production, its history and the origin of its name are all discussed

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Kings and Queens of England: Early Saxons

The murder of Edward the Martyr

One of the first difficulties encountered when attempting to chronicle any period of history is where to start. Some may start a history of the monarchs of England with Alfred the Great, who drove back the Danes and secured his kingdom of Wessex. Others may choose to begin in

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